Art of Problem Solving Academy comes to Atlanta

August 22, 2019 Leave a comment

Art of Problem Solving (AoPS) Academy offers math and language arts classes to motivated students. Its new campus in Johns Creek is now enrolling.

Math classes start at the second-grade level and continue through calculus. Special class sections that prepare kids for math competitions also are available. AoPS math is ideal for students who are bored in their school math class, who want to challenge themselves with more math, or who want to excel in math competition.

Language arts classes begin at the second-grade level and reach a high-school level seminar in academic writing. This reading and writing program is relatively new to AoPS and is designed to help students communicate and collaborate.

AoPS began as a textbook company in 1993 and established its interactive online math classes in 2003. The Johns Creek location is the 10th AoPS center in the United States where students can take classes in person.

Classes for this academic year started this week, but students can join at any time.

Categories: Enrichment

Math festival and math enrichment classes at Emory

August 6, 2019 Leave a comment

Emory logoEmory Math Circle is a place for kids who want to take their math to a different level.

Students in grades 6 to 12 use games, puzzles and problems to look more deeply at how math works and discover fundamental advanced math concepts.

Math Circle meets on weekends — about twice a month — on the Emory campus. Groups are taught by Ph.D. students from Emory and Georgia Tech.

The next session of Math Circle will begin in mid-September. Registration ends August 31.

Another math enrichment opportunity at Emory is a Julia Robinson Math Festival on Sept. 7, in the atrium of the Math and Science Center. At this afternoon drop-in event, students can visit multiple stations where they’ll explore math problems and concepts, with guidance from mathematicians. It’s free and open to the whole family.

Categories: Enrichment

National YoungArts Foundation offers life-long support for teens gifted in visual, performing, or literary arts

July 11, 2019 Leave a comment

Being admitted to the National YoungArts program is more than an honor. It’s a passport to a lifetime of mentoring and support in the arts.

The National Arts Competition is open to artists ages 15 to 18, or in grades 10 to 12, in these artistic disciplines:

  • classical music
  • dance
  • design arts
  • film
  • jazz
  • photography
  • theater
  • visual arts
  • voice
  • writing

Winners will receive cash awards, take classes with accomplished artists, and benefit from a lifetime of mentoring, performance opportunities, and professional support.

The application deadline is Oct. 11, 2019. Find out more at the YoungArts competition web site and in this recent article from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Can you design a better way to grow plants in space? Enter this contest.

July 9, 2019 Leave a comment

The International Space Station isn’t the easiest place for agriculture. There’s simply not much room for a garden. Today, plants aboard the spaceship are grown in small cubes. It’s workable, but it doesn’t maximize the available space.

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden is working with NASA to improve gardening systems for the ISS and has opened the Growing Beyond Earth Maker Contest. The contest challenges students in high school and college, as well as professionals, to design and build better systems.

Entries will be judged by a panel of NASA scientists. Five winners will be selected from each level (high school, college, professional). Those winners will go on to have their designs tested to determine the final three winners.

Register now to start getting information and briefings. An initial webinar with information about current gardening systems aboard the ISS will be tomorrow, July 10. The final deadline for finished designs is Feb. 3, 2020.

Data science project at Emory seeks high school and college students

July 7, 2019 Leave a comment

Ymir Vigfusson, assistant professor of computer science at Emory University, describes himself as a computer hacker. More accurately, he goes on the offensive to test the security of computer systems.

Vigfusson is the faculty advisor for the Coke Rewards Code Citizen Science Project, a research project being conducted by Ph.D. students in the Emory math department. The project combines data science, statistics, and machine learning to investigate the security risks in the generation of codes for the Coke Rewards program.

The graduate students are looking for help from students in 9th grade or higher with an interest in computer science, data science, cryptography, or related fields. Programming experience isn’t required. Students will complete a tutorial in the Python programming language, which will be used in the analysis of the codes.

The project is expected to run through September 2019. Work can be done on the Emory campus or remotely, and the hours are completely flexible.

After working on the project, students can use what they’ve learned as the basis for independent science fair projects.

Categories: Enrichment

It’s that time again: Firefly Watch

June 7, 2019 Leave a comment

I’ve been noticing fireflies in the evenings the past week or two. That reminds me, it’s time again for Firefly Watch.

This is a low-commitment, fun way to involve children in citizen science. If you can spend a minimum of 10 minutes a week observing fireflies in your back yard, you can take part in this project that helps Tufts University researchers track firefly populations across North America. It’s easy to do, and the web site letsĀ  you compare your data with what observers in other regions are seeing.

Firefly Watch began in 2008 as a program of the Museum of Science in Boston. It’s now part of Mass Audubon. Participation is free.

Categories: Enrichment

New, private high school for self-motivated learners

May 27, 2019 Leave a comment

Coming to the Atlanta area this fall: Sora Schools, a private high school catering to students who want to create their own educational path.

Sora Schools is for self-directed students, especially those with a passion that falls outside the bounds of traditional academics. Examples include computer science, writing or film-making.

At Sora Schools, students complete personal projects that utilize their passion and incorporate other academic elements, keeping them engaged while ensuring they’re exposed to a broad education.

School is mostly conducted online, with students meeting in person once a week in the Dunwoody area.

Spaces are available for the 2019-2020 school year.

Categories: In the schools